Human Well-Paid Position

Hi all!

I have another question, this time about Human resources. I have a player who is planning to buy a “well-paid position” in the human resource section for 40 RPs. My only problem is that I have no idea what mechanical effect it has. If he were to buy a house or something, I understand what the fictional advantages would be there. With this, however, I’m not sure what it gets him. Should I be giving him advantage dice on lifestyle checks in exchange for having to deal with his job? Is there a section I’m missing where it explains that this should give him a fund to call on?

Thanks in advance for any help!

Do you know what the position is specifically?

Yup. He’s working in a court position. Essentially he’s a “Devil’s Advocate”, who’s job is to serve as a court contrarian. We established that there is around 10-15 others with the same position at court, and they serve at the behest of various higher-ups, helping them to find holes in their policies.

They’re buying a sinecure – a salary for a position equivalent to the mayor of a town. Mechanically it allows them to spend 40 rps on property, which gets factored into the character’s starting Resources exponent. Assuming the character has spent at least 5 more rps on property or affiliations, they’ll start with Resources B3.

It doesn’t grant any mechanical benefit beyond that, though of course the position may grant access to characters that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

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Yeah, the 40 Rps on Property was definitely the big draw, I think. And it lets you do so while maintaining certain conceptual constraints, “My guy is pretty well-off, but leads to much of an urban lifestyle to justify a villa or something.” And the 40 Rps goes nicely with 5 Rps to spend on Rent.

I feel like a kind GM might also allow the character to bypass any social obstacle to Get a Job! (Don’t need to Circles up a patron and convince them to hire you when you’re already on salary.), and a canny player might lobby for an Advantage Die when working that job - “My guy’s been doing this for a while; he’s already got his foot in the door.”

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